Mono 安装

作者: 时间: 2015-09-23 评论: 暂无评论

To start, lets install Mono first. As of posting this guide, this will install Mono 3.4.0.
Open /etc/yum.repo.d/mono.repoin your favorite editor.
The file probably does not exist you need to create it!
Add the following text to the above file:

    [home_tpokorra_mono]
name=mono and monodevelop (CentOS_CentOS-6)
type=rpm-md
baseurl=http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/tpokorra:/mono/CentOS_CentOS-6/
gpgcheck=1
gpgkey=http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/tpokorra:/mono/CentOS_CentOS-6/repodata/repomd.xml.key
enabled=1

Save the file and exit your editor.
Run an update on yum first before we try to install anything via:
yum update
Next, lets install the needed Mono packages with:
yum install mono-*opt
Accept any downloads it requires and such, you should only need to say yes to 1 prompt.
Next we need to register executables to the binfmt via the following command:
echo ':CLR:M::MZ::/usr/local/bin/mono:' > /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc/register
Next we need to adjust our PATH variable. I personally edit the .bashrc file for this.
Open ~/.bashrc in your favorite editor.
Near the top (above the current alias' if any) add the following line:
export PATH=/opt/mono/bin:$PATH
Mono should now be installed and working.
You can type mono --version to print out the version info.

Help, my map does not show up! Players just fall endlessly!
This is due to missing libs. Shutdown your server and run the following command:
find / -name libMonoPosixHelper.so

This should locate the library within 1 or more directories. For example like this:
*[root@root /]# find / -name libMonoPosixHelper.so
/opt/mono/lib/libMonoPosixHelper.so
/usr/local/src/mono-3.4.0/support/.libs/libMonoPosixHelper.so
[root@root /]#*

We need to add the /opt/mono/lib folder to our environment variables library path.
To do that, do the following:
Open ~/.bashrc in your favorite editor.
Locate were we added export PATH and under that add:
export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/opt/mono/lib:$LD_LIBRARY_PATH
Be sure to change the /opt/mono/lib to the folder that was found in your find results!

dontstarve

作者: 时间: 2015-09-09 评论: 暂无评论
yum install -y libidn* nss* openldap* openssl*
yum install -y libidn-1.18-2.el6.i686 openssl-1.0.1e-42.el6_7.2.i686 openldap-2.4.40-7.el6_7.i686  nss-3.19.1-8.el6_7.i686
yum install -y openldap-2.4.40-6.el6_7.i686

yum provides "libssl.so.10"
find . -print|grep libpthread.so.0`

--setopt=protected_multilib=false

Steam on EL6 (RHEL6 / Scientific Linux 6 / CentOS 6)

作者: 时间: 2015-07-05 评论: 暂无评论

The fact that Steam have decided to only officially support .deb based distributions, and only relatively recent ones at that has been a pet peeve of mine for quite some time. While there are ways around the .deb only official package availability (e.g. alien), the library requirements are somewhat more difficult to reconcile. I have finally managed to get Steam working on EL6 and I figure I’m probably not the only one interested in this, so I thought I’d document it.

Different packages required to do this have been sourced from different locations (e.g. glibc from fuduntu project, steam src.rpm from steam.48.io (not really a source rpm, it just packages the steam binary in a rpm), most of the rest from more recent Fedoras, etc.). I have rebuilt them all and made them available in one place:

http://ftp.redsleeve.org/pub/steam/

You won’t need all of them, but you will need at least the following:

glibc-2.15-60.el6.i686.rpm
glibc-2.15-60.el6.x86_64.rpm
glibc-common-2.15-60.el6.x86_64.rpm
glibc-devel-2.15-60.el6.x86_64.rpm
glibc-headers-2.15-60.el6.x86_64.rpm
libtxc_dxtn-1.0.0-2.1.i686.rpm
SDL2-2.0.3-2.el6.i686.rpm
steam-1.0.0.39-2.i686.rpm
xz-5.0.5-1.el6.x86_64.rpm
xz-compat-libs-5.0.5-1.el6.x86_64.rpm
xz-libs-5.0.5-1.el6.x86_64.rpm
xz-lzma-compat-5.0.5-1.el6.x86_64.rpm

First install some the dependencies from the standard distribution packages:download

yum install gtk2-engines.i686 \
            openal-soft.i686 \
            alsa-plugins-pulseaudio.i686 \
            gtk+.i686

The install the updated packages:

rpm -Uvh glibc-2.15-60.el6.i686.rpm \
     glibc-2.15-60.el6.x86_64.rpm \
     glibc-common-2.15-60.el6.x86_64.rpm \
     glibc-devel-2.15-60.el6.x86_64.rpm \
     glibc-headers-2.15-60.el6.x86_64.rpm \
     libtxc_dxtn-1.0.0-2.1.i686.rpm \
     SDL2-2.0.3-2.el6.i686.rpm \
     steam-1.0.0.39-2.i686.rpm \
     xz-5.0.5-1.el6.x86_64.rpm \
     xz-compat-libs-5.0.5-1.el6.x86_64.rpm \
     xz-libs-5.0.5-1.el6.x86_64.rpm \
     xz-lzma-compat-5.0.5-1.el6.x86_64.rpm

If you have pyliblzma from EPEL installed (required by, e.g. mock), updated xz-lzma-compat package will trigger a python bug that causes a segfault. This will incapacitate some python programs (yum being an important one). If you encounter this issue and you must have pyliblzma for other dependencies, reinstall the original xz package versions after you run steam for the first time. Updated xz only seems to be required when the steam executable downloads updates for itself.

Finally, run steam, log in, and let it update itself.

One of the popular games that is available on Linux is Left 4 Dead 2. I found that on ATI and Nvidia cards it doesn’t work properly in full screen mode (blank screen, impossible to Alt-Tab out), but it does work on Intel GPUs. It works on all GPU types in windowed mode. Unfortunately, it runs in full screen mode by default, so if you run it without adjusting its startup parameters you may have to ssh into the machine and forcefully kill the hl2_linux process. To work around the problem, right click on the game in your library, and go to properties:

Steam Game Properties

Click on the “SET LAUNCH OPTIONS…” button:

Steam Game Properties 2

You will probably want to specify the default resolution as well as the windowed mode to ensure the game comes up in a sensible mode when you launch it.
Add “-windowed -w 1280 -h 720″ to the options, which will tell L4D2 to start in windowed mode with 1280×720 resolution. The resolution you select should be lower than your monitor’s resolution.

Steam Game Launch Options

If you did all that, you should be able to hit the play button and be greeted with something resembling this:

Left4Dead 2 with Steam on Linux

ATI cards using the open source Radeon driver (at least with the version 7.1.0 that ships with EL6) seem to exhibit some rendering corruption, specifically some textures are intermittently invisible. This leads to invisible party members, enemies, and doors, and while it is entertaining for the first few seconds it renders the game completely unplayable. I have not tested the ATI binary driver (ATI themselves recommend the open source driver on Linux for older cards and I am using a HD6450).

Nvidia cards work fine with the closed source binary driver in windowed mode, and performance with a GT630 constantly saturates 1080p resolutions with everything turned up to maximum. I have not tested with the nouveau open source driver.

With Intel GPUs using the open source driver, everything works correctly in both windowed and full screen mode, but the performance is nowhere nearly as good as with the Nvidia card. With all the settings set to maximum, the performance with the Intel HD 4000 graphics (Chromebook Pixel) is roughly the same at 1920×1200 resolution as with the Radeon HD6450, producing approximately 30fps. The only problem with playing it on the Chromebook Pixel is that the whole laptop gets too hot to touch, even with the fan going at full speed. Not only does the aluminium casing get too hot to touch, the plastic keys on the keyboard themselves get painfully hot. But that story is for another article.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged linux, nvidia, steam by altechnative. Bookmark the permalink.
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